Fashion Isn't Just about Fashion, With Personal Stylist Nicole Russo

EPISODE 10

Practical tips from a former Net-A-Porter New York City based personal stylist, Nicole Russo. This is not just for fashion enthusiasts, this is for every woman. We dig deep into the psychology of what you're wearing as well as what is appropriate at our age. How do you make sure your wardrobe doesn’t get stuck years behind and actually transitions along with you through your life?

Nicole is a fashion and shopping expert, but she’s also passionate about people and finding out their personality. She works one-on-one with her clients to help them discover who they truly are and how they can dress in a way that helps them own the room every single day. Shopping for clothes doesn’t have to be stressful, and with her help it won’t be. She also does virtual help for those of you who are interested. You can listen to Nicole as she brings her expertise in this episode, and hopefully take away some key points that you can apply to your own life.


In less than a decade, Nicole has styled hundreds of people, sat front row at NYFW, been featured in Fast Company, and spent over four years working at luxury powerhouse NET-A-PORTER. She blends the technical side of fashion and retail to build your ideal wardrobe in an efficient, fun way. One that fine-tunes your personal style and brings you an overall more fulfilling life.


You can connect with Nicole at letsgetyou.com as well as on Instagram @_letsgetyou

EPISODE TRANSCRIPT

Doryn Wallach:

Hi, I'm Doryn Wallach and you're listening to It's Not A Crisis, a podcast for women in their 40s seeking to navigate life's challenges while making the most of it, which means let's do things now so that we can look at this next chapter as a very positive and happy time in our lives. I don't want anyone to dread or regret anything, although I guess regret is part of life, but I wanted to create this podcast to talk about all the ways that we can just make our lives more fulfilled, more positive, and happier overall.

So today I have an amazing guest. I know her personally, as I do a lot of my guests. Her name is Nicole Russo and she's an incredible fashion stylist. I originally found her on Net-A-Porter and she had helped me with some events that I had to go to. And then after she left Net-A-Porter, I decided to use her for some other things. And what I love about Nicole is that while Nicole has her own style, she doesn't try to put that on other people. She reads people really, really well, and she gets you. And she knows that not everything looks great on every person. She understands bodies. She understands lifestyle. She understands even more than that. It goes deeper almost psychologically. And when I talk to her, you'll hear me talk a little bit about that.

In less than a decade, Nicole has styled hundreds of people. She sat in the front row at New York Fashion Week. She's been featured in Fast Company and spent over four years working at the luxury powerhouse Net-A-Porter. She blends technical sides of fashion and retail to build your ideal wardrobe in an efficient and fun way, and one that fine tunes your personal style and brings you an overall more fulfilling life. That couldn't be more true. I'm very excited for you guys to learn a little bit about what is age appropriate at our age, how our body is changing and how to address it, how to still look great and buy trends that won't date us and a bunch of other things.

So as usual, if you could please subscribe to my podcast, share my Instagram, share the podcasts with your friends. If you like them, please send me emails to it'snotacrisis@gmail.com. I love hearing from you. I love hearing your ideas. I love interacting with you on social media. So keep doing that, it's really fun for me. I do this podcast because it's just kind of, I'm passionate about helping women and I'm learning along with you. So thank you and just much appreciated, always. Nicole, welcome to the show. I am so excited to have you here.


Nicole Russo:

Hey Doryn, I am so excited. We've been trying to do this for a little while and-


Doryn Wallach:

So long.


Nicole Russo:

... I'm amped. I'm actually so amped. I just love chatting with you, so I feel like it's just going to be fun.


Doryn Wallach:

Well, so I've talked a little bit about how I met you, but I found you at Net-A-Porter and I don't actually recall how or what, but one of the things that stuck out to me about you was that you really, and I said this in my opener, you just understand style from the point of view that some stylists just don't get. You understand body, you understand lifestyle, and you really understand each person and you don't try to put something on them that's not comfortable, but at the same time, you push boundaries just a little bit. And I appreciate that in the past, when we've worked together, because you've showed me ways to not only wear things, that I never even knew looked appropriate on my body type, but also how to keep within my style.

That's one of the reasons I love you, but the main reason I love you is you're just such an awesome, wonderful person. And I don't have anybody on the show that I don't jive with and that I don't feel can add anything important, but also I want to make sure that it's people that, women that I'm supporting, businesses and what they're doing when I really believe in them. So, with that being said-


Nicole Russo:

Aww, that was so nice. I'm over here like, "That's so sweet." I mean, I'm very passionate about bringing out people's ... when I style, I think what is unique is I look at it on a very organic level. I'm like, who and what that person is and how can I draw them out? And how can I facilitate their personal growth? How can I show them a way of dressing themselves that heightens their confidence, but also their sense of possibility through what they wear, and then it kind of reverberates into their life.

For example, I always say that your closet is a metaphor for your life. And the reason that I say that is because what we do in our closet directly is reflective on how we do things in our life. So if we aren't as confident taking risks, or we are impacted by other people's opinions, or we tend to overly criticize ourselves, and some of them could even be, we are a little cookie and we're very creative. So they can be multifaceted. And, but just like things in other parts of our lives, we maybe don't see opportunity or we're short-sighted because of old habits, or what's always worked for us. So I like to allow my clients to see more of themselves through pushing them outside their boundaries in a safe way that feels comfortable for them, but also makes them feel like more of what they already are.

So when they have new clothes or they have new outfits, it's not scary. When someone hires someone like me, they're really looking for solutions to a problem which may be, they don't have time to shop, they are kind of feeling dated. They might have an event or an upcoming point of change in their life, like weight loss or children, or they could be just changing careers, all these things that are sort of facilitating the need, but they are also seeking a state of mind. We're seeking this easy effortlessness. They want to get dressed, they don't want to feel frustrated. They want to feel like it's just fine if you put on some clothes.


Doryn Wallach:

You're very intuitive and I think you're very, I don't know how to say this right, but you're very in tune to your intuitiveness. You really are. So I hire Nicole on occasion to go into my closet seasonally and pick out outfits for me to wear, because I, so I like fashion. It's really not my biggest focus in life. In fact, doing what I do as a jewelry designer, sometimes it feels intimidating to me because I feel like I have to look a certain way based on my industry, but there are times where I'm just super happy in my baseball hat and jean shorts and a t-shirt.

So Nicole will come into my closet and kind of in Clueless how Cher had her outfits all done for her, that's what Nicole does for me and it's awesome. She will come in and she will pick out outfits and for day or night, or if I have an event or if I have something work-related, I have the outfit there and I can just look at it. And I don't know if they think about it, which is great. So I mentioned this Nicole, on another one of my podcasts. Nicole had recently come into my closet and it was one of the reasons I wanted to have her on the show, and she's very honest. And what you do in such a way that's, you're honest, but it's not critical.


So Nicole came into, she said, "Doryn, I got to lay this out for you. I really have to be honest with you." And I said, "Okay, I can handle it." And she said, "My issue with looking in your closet is," I have a very glamorous, amazing mom who has her own style and flair. And I've always looked up to her for that because she just doesn't care what anybody thinks. But in some ways, she could be a little old fashioned when it comes to style and a little more classic maybe is the word I should use than I am. And Nicole said, "I feel like half your closet is who you are and half your closet is who your mom is and who your mom probably wants you to be. And I think that you need to start to hone in a little bit more on who you are."

And it was in that moment right there that I was like, "Oh wow, that doesn't just pertain to my closet. That pertains to so much of my life." And in my 40s, I look up to my mom and I adore my mom, but there's something about, you tend to seek approval from someone you look up to. And especially somebody as fashionable as my mom. And I think that sometimes even when I'm designing my jewelry or I'm picking out clothes, I'm like, "What would my mom think?" And there's this other side of me that has this kind of more edgy, maybe more casual, maybe sometimes a little bit more hippy, bohemian, I don't know what it is, that is so not what my mom is. And Nicole, she called me out on it and she was right.

My problem is, and I'm getting this as I get older and I think other women who are listening will agree, that as I get deeper into my 40s, I'm gaining more confidence and I care less what people think. So I'm starting to hone in on what my style is. And also, I'm also like comfort has become more popular for me, because I just don't care that much. I mean, I know you always are on me for like, "Okay, you can be comfortable, but you can put on a good shoe." And I do love my shoes. So I guess the first place to start with you, because I think that the psychological part of it is really important, and personally, everyone listening, I feel like I haven't figured it out yet. Just like I haven't figured out a lot of things yet. And that's part of why I have this podcast, because we're all trying to figure this crazy decade out on our own. But the latest thing that I feel that I'm struggling with and I'm sure other women are struggling with is, what is age appropriate anymore?

Women are looking more and more amazing as they get older and spend time, there are so many ways we can work out today, online, amazing classes here and there. And I do find myself looking at something. So now my daughter will be 13 in a couple of weeks and I start to see things that she likes and I'm like, "Ooh, I like that." And then I'm like, "Well, if she's wearing that, I can't wear that." So first question is, what is age appropriate? How do we even know today? I feel like it's just, I think it's more confusing today than ever.


Nicole Russo:

Oh my gosh, there's so much to unpack. So, I'm just like, where do I begin?


Doryn Wallach:

I know, sorry. That was a lot.


Nicole Russo:

No, no. It's just like, to begin with is that, we're not alone. A lot of us as women in particular, we're kind of taught that dressing and shopping and looking and feeling fabulous is supposed to be naturally easy, and that's not true at all. It is something that most of the people I think are not innately born with. And I find that there's this, when we kind of get over the hurdle of thinking that this should be easy, it becomes a lot more self accepting that figuring it out is more normal than being naturally good at it.

So, for starters, I think we need to look at that. And when it comes to age appropriateness and especially your comment about your daughter is that, 40 years ago or 10 years, even 20 years ago, age appropriateness was based on the notion that there were strict rules about what you can and cannot do. There were limitations that were given to us because of a certain bracket of age that you passed upon. Rules that are actually still being inundated with to us. And I think that the reason that we hear them and it's particularly from other women, is that they are ways to create division and they are ways to create self judgment and judgment amongst each other. Because if you are not doing something right, therefore you are not as good as me or not as good as the other. And therefore there's this sense of lack.

And I don't really believe truly as a stylist, I don't believe there is such a thing as age appropriate. I think that what is not age appropriate is the thing that you are the most uncomfortable in, and the thing that makes you feel as though you're wearing a costume, or something that represents another part of your life or another part of yourself.

So to explain that further is, there are a lot of fun, playful, child-like fashions, like glitter or sequins or applique, or light-up shoes, things that are, or lots of color that are very useful, right? And if you are a woman who is in her 40s or 50s or 60s and you appreciate those components, that doesn't mean that you cannot wear something sparkly or something neon. What it is is that you may want to use specific elements of what you like in a mature way. So if you're wearing, you love neons, maybe you can wear a neon blazer or something that has a neon detail, like in a shoe.

So it's really about, how do you interpret what you like and what you're drawn to that maybe useful or immature, and how can you pair that back into the life that you live now? Which may be a business woman or a mom or a retiree, or someone who's playing with her grandkids on the floor. There could be different parts of your life. And I think that a lot of times when we're worried about what's age appropriate, we're worried about what other people are going to think of us because of where we are in our life. I often say going back to the closet is a metaphor for your life thing is that there's, we often have multiple people in our closet.

The example you brought up Doryn about your mom, and then you and ... those are two components of your closet that are sort of competing with each other, which made it a little more challenging for you to get dressed and feel good in your outfits daily, or come up with them creatively, because they weren't really flowing together naturally. They were two competing elements. And once we address those things and that's something I help with in particular, not only by bringing up the idea to you or to the client and making them aware of it, but also seeing the opportunities in which, if you're a little bohemian but also casual, but then there's a timelessness and classiness to your style, they seem like counterpoints, how can you bring them together? But as you develop a sense of self that's more confident and you start to care less about what people think, it's like a muscle. You have a natural ability to put the outfits together and dress easier for different situations that feel good, but then what is weird or out of the box, or maybe a risk suddenly becomes smaller and smaller and smaller.

You literally develop a greater strength in dealing with giving, caring what people think, and that's where I see the magic. That's why I love the concept of styling and clothes. So that's a really, I guess multifaceted way to answer that. There is no such thing as age appropriateness, the only limitations we create are the ones for ourselves. And if you have them for yourself, and that's okay if you want to say that this is what's appropriate for me. But the only other thing I would say personally that I think is not appropriate is, what I advise people is, are you dressing the same way you were 10 years ago? That means that you're not evolving as a person. And when you look dated, it's because you're not evolving and you're not growing and that's when it looks in-age appropriate. That's when I feel like people look like they're dressing too young or dressing like they don't belong, because their body's a little different, they are a little different, but yet their presentation of themselves hasn't changed. And that's when I think it just looks kind of weird.


Doryn Wallach:

Here's one of the things I struggle with, and I mentioned my daughter. I'm getting to an age now where I still want to wear short skirts because I like my legs and I don't mean skin tight, trashy skirts. And I like to feel youthful in the way that I dress. But I feel like I'm also a role model for her. And not that, you know me, it's not like I'm wearing anything crazy and risque. But I bought this dress recently. It was like kind of a layered ruffled skirt on the bottom and really pretty and I really like it. But I had bought it when we were shopping with Tatum, at a store where there were things for her. But my mom was there, of course, I needed the confirmation, and I love it. And it feels youthful to me, but without making me feel like I look like a kid.

So I think that that's for me now, this is a whole other thing that I think about, or when I'm dressing, because my daughter is just finding her style. And by the way, we are going to do another podcast on teens and tweens because Nicole is actually helping my daughter kind of hone in on what her style is right now. And I think that at her age where her body's changing, it's important to really feel confident and find who you are. So it's great to hear what you just said, and I think that all of that makes sense and I think that sometimes in our head, we're still in the '90s and we'll put something on that we, I mean, in the summer, I genuinely look the way I did in high school, because I wear shorts and t-shirt and a baseball hat every day. Except when I get dressed up at night, and that's really how I [crosstalk 00:20:09].


Nicole Russo:

Well, it's something that's timeless.


Doryn Wallach:

Yeah, totally timeless.


Nicole Russo:

I mean, that doesn't get old. Certain things never die and that's okay. And that doesn't mean that you're not growing up, right?


Doryn Wallach:

Right. And I always say there's summer Doryn and there's fall winter Doryn, because I love fall winter clothes. I love leather. I love boots. I love dresses. I like tights and I feel like in summer, I just don't care as much. So anyway, the other topic I feel like has come up a lot for a lot of women is our bodies are changing in our 40s. So I have noticed, not only is it harder to lose weight in our 40s, but I am gaining weight in places I never gained before. I think a lot of women are starting to struggle with the mid section and I've read that that's hormonally related, and even hips and your boobs are sagging, they're not looking as good as they used to. And it's hard because you, it's hard to see your body change. So some tips on how do we evolve our clothes with our bodies or anything that we can do to make that feel better for all of us?


Nicole Russo:

Yeah. I mean, it's very common. I mean, that's the other thing is that when we develop a little bit of knowledge and that's why even giving Tatum some skills now, because as she continues to grow up and become a young woman and maybe possibly have children. And then also go through her 40s and a phase of life where herself is changing. It gives you this skillset that you can then use for the rest of your life. So it's something that sort of has a compound effect. I actually think that what's really common is a lot of the changes that happen like you described, are very similar to postpartum, right? So you're going through a very ... you're not as familiar with the body you have, it feels a little foreign, there's different shapes that you're not used to dealing with. Maybe things have expanded or gone different directions. And what used to work and used to be our go-to may have now not feel as good in, right?

So what I recommend that people do is, and this is one of my ... is you really want to look at imagery that works for, or outfits that work for you, and figure out what it is about those things that you like. Right? You may have loved, for example, you love a shorts and a t-shirt, okay. But there are so many different styles of that if you want to look at it. So you can do boxy t-shirts, off the shoulder, slouchy, you can do a vsco versus a cotton blend. Things can have structure.

So let's say for example, you are not as comfortable with your midsection, but you happen to also be very petite, maybe you're shorter, right? So what used to work might be, you might wear smaller or more shrunken tees because you were petite and therefore oversize things, you didn't feel as confident in. I'm making this up. This is not you. This is an example.


Doryn Wallach:

Yeah, no, it is definitely, I'm definitely not petite. Yeah.


Nicole Russo:

No. But if you're 5'1" and that's something that you are seeing as changing for you, maybe you can shift to the thing that you may love about t-shirts is how they're easy and breezy and sort of classic, right? So maybe instead of that, you move into something like a linen button up. It still has easy breezy shape, unlike a structured button up and then, but you wear something that is slightly more tailored, and then therefore it will show the narrowness of your shape, as opposed to a boxy tee, which is going to widen you.

So you kind of take the things that you like and you see what other things exist in the market that fit well, or that fit better, or solve this "problem". And I use quotations, I figure the problem that you think is there or you feel is there, and then, but gives you the result you're looking for.

So we kind of have to deconstruct it and make it a little bit more logical and less emotional, because there's so much available that there is usually, there's a solution. And it could be something as simple as the rise of a pant or the fabric of a pant. So I think that the first phase is, you kind of just have to honor that things are changing, that things are different, but that doesn't mean that you can't look stylish and feel great. You're not being put out to pasture, it's just that there's a change. And if you move with that change and you honor the change and you work with it, you will get to a solution to the other side and you can still feel fabulous with what you are, because the goals that we have are all to feel good. We all just want to have confidence and feel amazing. And I think the only reason we think we felt that way when we were younger, is because we were just dumb enough to not be aware.


Doryn Wallach:

I think you're right, exactly. And I would recommend to everybody that you consult with a fashion stylist every few years if you can, because as your body changes, they will help you to understand how to wear clothes for your body that is changing, in a way that will make you feel amazing. Nicole is great at that and we'll talk about it at the end, but Nicole also does virtual if you're not in the New York area. But I think that that's really important.

Let's just, one example. Let's say you're a woman who is flat chested because your kids ruined your boobs, and you're very curvy on the bottom with maybe thicker legs but skinny arms. So given that example, what is your recommendation to dress someone like that?


Nicole Russo:

This is where I would first want to, just as a point, this is where knowing what people's personal preferences and goals are in terms of, are they more boho? Are they more preppy? Let's say she wanted to be timeless and classic. What I would do is that someone like that, what they often do is they see like say, for example, if it's summer and she sees a Bermuda short, which is a very common trend right now, and she may put that on and then her goal may be to look less curvy. Some women may actually really love the bottom shape and they want to show it off, but her goal may be to sort of de-emphasize it.

So a simple solution is to follow the shape of the body that you have in a sort of you skim it versus you tailor it. So a Bermuda short is an example of something that would tailor the body. So it would be kind of fitted, sort of snug. It would definitely show off the smaller waist, but it would also make the waist to hip ratio look more prominent so they would look more curvy on the bottom. It would also accent the thighs. So if that wasn't her goal and she wanted to de-emphasize that part or balance it with her top, I would say grab a, you can look for a short that has that same Bermuda style where it's cut off at the knee, kind of more of a higher waist, or at least at or around the belly button. But something that has a little bit more of a drape, almost like it fits like a boyfriend jean, or it fits like a relaxed linen pant, but it's in the short shape.

So paper bag pants are very common, have that shape in the leg or paper bag shorts, but this is something that wouldn't have that little cinch and flare and peplum. And then what you're going to do is, the reason that works for someone with that body type for example is because it doesn't actually draw the eye to it by overly emphasizing the curve, because it's not as tailored. But if you wear something that's very big and flowy on the bottom, you could then, women will often say they feel like they're wearing a tent or they feel like they look bigger. That is because all of the extra volume is, you can't see the actual body. So you sort of want to find a balance between showing the shape and working with the shape that you have, while also not overly emphasizing it by getting the material super close to the skin.

So that would be the quick, and you can do that with pants. You could do that with even a skirt for example. That's a really universal, it goes across the board. That would work even with women that are really thin and don't want to look as skinny, for example, they want to look a little more curvy. It's just, you want to kind of work with the lines that you're built with and you're using, and just find a middle ground between very fitted and overly flowy until you feel like, "Oh, I look really good."


Doryn Wallach:

Okay. That makes sense. Trend wise, so I do like some ... I've never been an overly trendy person because I'm one of these people that if everyone's wearing it, I don't want to wear it. It turns me off, but, there are occasional things that I want to integrate into my wardrobe. Is there an age cutoff for that, for trends? Are we allowed to ... How do you incorporate trends into your wardrobe that won't date you, I guess is the question I'm asking.


Nicole Russo:

I would say the best way to do it is actually to figure out what about the trend that you like. So for example, nautical was recently a trend for fall. Red was a big trend for fall. And you're going to find sexy red slinky dresses and you're going to find sophisticated red blazers, or you're going to find youthful bomber jacket or track jackets in a sort of a nautical theme. And then that might feel more almost immaturish or too much like you're 22 at the cape or something.

So if that's the case, you want to move towards the trend that you like, and then, but in iterations that work for your life and your lifestyle. I'm sure I could go through trends, hit history of trends and be like, "I don't know if that's really great for a 56 year old." But honestly, I know there are women in their 50s and 60s who are icons in fashion right now that were wearing crop tops.

So I'm not going to necessarily say that one cannot or should not. But what I will say is, is that if you see a trend, like an anklet for example as kind of trendy, there are definitely ways that ... or there's plastic colorful jewelry. You can wear those kinds of ... or even fruit shaped jewelry. I think that there are ways that you could wear that and still look very sophisticated or mature or confident, because the best dressed woman really has the knowledge of what works for her and the confidence to pull it off. So that is really what it is, is knowing and identifying what you like, and how does it work into your lifestyle and finding those trends or those things that are popular right now and incorporate it into your world in a way that makes sense for you. And when you do that, you'll never look dated.


Doryn Wallach:

Yeah. All right. My last question for you is, you had brought this up earlier, I just wanted you to expand on it a little bit about why your closet is a metaphor for your life. And yeah, I mean, just go into a little bit about what you mean by that.


Nicole Russo:

I think, if we can circle back to even what you said before when I brought to your attention kind of the idea that you had this Doryn style, and then there was this your mom's influence also sort of sitting in your-


Doryn Wallach:

What is my Doryn style?


Nicole Russo:

... You are a little boho-ey, a little edgy, downtown, like rocker, very down to earth, a little bit playful '70s. You have kind of a, it's not hippy, it's not the right way to explain it. It's more of the, "I don't really care, I just like what I like and I'm going to wear it" kind of attitude. And you have this really sophisticated, timeless, classic component that's in your closet as well, which is beautiful. Like stiletto patent shoes, leopard prints, tailored dresses, lots of black. There's these almost like Upper East Side rich girls chic, that are there, like these touches of it. And you see that in the quality of the things that you buy too.

Because a lot of what you pick are, you can see the selection and finding things that are really, really high quality. So having known you as a person, I feel like those are two very strong components of who you are. So you're very chill, you're the kind of girl who just wants to be on the beach hanging in your hammock, reading a good book. Doing nothing, no pretense, you don't need to be seen or seeny, and then there's also this part of you that's super sophisticated and pulled together and very ladylike and feminine and mature. And when I say-


Doryn Wallach:

And immature.


Nicole Russo:

... Yeah, and then there's that immaturity, exactly. So that's where I think the rocker, sort of boho, yeah, there's this "I give no fucks" kind of side of you that sort of is like that playfulness. And I think that that's an example of how your closet is a metaphor for your life. So you, when you brought up your mom and your closet, you made a comment saying when I brought to your attention that she was sort of present in there, her influence of who you want to be because of who your mom wants you to be, you made a comment saying, "Yeah, that's sort of how my ... that hits other parts of my life too." So that's what I mean, that's an example.


Doryn Wallach:

It's so wild because it's, I mean, everything you're saying is so true and I sometimes feel schizophrenic in my fashion because I like so many different things and it depends on my mood. There are days where, when I'm in a bad mood, I'm usually in my combat boots and my leather jacket or my Moda boots or it's kind of, it's just funny. This summer you would be so surprised because of the whole pandemic, I bought all of these bright, floral dresses and bright sweaters and colors and Birkenstocks of all colors. And just like, I was like, "You know what? Everything is so depressing right now. I just feel like being bright."


Nicole Russo:

Yeah. So that's an example of your mood directly reflected, how and what was happening in your life right now directly reflected the way that you were dressing yourself. And what I feel is interesting, and this is what I do and what I believe in is that you can kind of rig it where I can't, whatever other components of your life where this balance, these interactions with your mom, how it impacts other parts of your life, I can't really have anything to do with that. But what I can say is, if I can draw it in and kind of figure out a way to kind of make sense of it in your closet, then as you develop that confidence or as you develop that understanding in yourself when you're getting dressed every day, which we all do, regardless of what you're putting on, that then impacts what interaction you may have later.


Doryn Wallach:

Yeah. And you know what, listen, if you're someone who really doesn't even care about clothes or fashion, I still think talking to somebody like Nicole is super helpful because I actually, I can't say I don't care, but it's definitely not my priority. But in the times that we've worked together and you've put things together for me, it made me excited about wearing clothes, especially when it was all laid out for me and I could just be like, "Okay, I'm going to put this with this, this, this and now I know what I'm going to wear today and I don't have to think about it."

I think part of the problem of people just wearing the same thing every day is, you just don't want to think about it. If you're not that person to kind of like, "Ugh, what am I going to put?" You just end up wearing the same thing all the time because it's just easier than thinking, and we have enough to deal with anyway.

Well, listen, we have to wrap up, but I loved having you on. And I wanted to ask you, I always ask my guests at the end of the show, what would you tell your younger self today, if you could give yourself a piece of advice?


Nicole Russo:

Dump him.


Doryn Wallach:

That's a good one. I'm sure a lot of us could say that.


Nicole Russo:

Yeah, I'm sure.


Doryn Wallach:

I'm sure a lot of us could.


Nicole Russo:

Oh, I wish it would be more poetic, but honestly, that would be the one I would go with.


Doryn Wallach:

I appreciate that and I don't think you're alone in that. Well, thank you so much and tell everyone how they can find you.


Nicole Russo:

Yeah, you can find me at, so my company name is Let's Get You. So you can find me at let'sgetyou.com and you can find my Instagram, I'm very active. It's _letsgetyou and DM me, I mean, I'm the girl you're going to be interacting with. So say hi and I'd love to hear from you.


Doryn Wallach:

And just a little bit about your services, what are you offering right now? Because I know obviously things have changed.


Nicole Russo:

So normally my services are in-person but I am offering a virtual process and program that does allow people to sort of gain the same insights and clarity and wardrobe building that I'm basically using my Net-A-Porter skills of working with people remotely and online. And I can do that with you basically anywhere in the world. So I have clients all over now. And if you are someone who is not in your one of your homes, or if you want me to come in and work in your closet while you aren't home, I am offering that as well, if you are within the New York City metro region.


Doryn Wallach:

Good, I'm going to do a big purge this ... I'm actually going back to my apartment next week and I'm purging a bunch of stuff, but there's, I swear, I don't know. I don't know if it's the pandemic, but there are just, I had gone back to the city and saw a few things in my closet and I was like, "No, not me anymore." So I don't know what it is. It was me in the fall and now I'm over it. So I'm going to be in touch with you, although I don't think anyone's going to see me for months anyway.

All right, Nicole, thank you again for coming on. It's always good to talk to you. Let me know if you are interested, if anybody is interested in hearing Nicole talk a little bit about our tweens and teens. Because I think from a mom's perspective, it's how to support their individual style, but also how to make sure they're confident. But at the same time, there's just some looks going on right now that I am not okay with. And then I've circled back from the '90s when I was a teenager and I really wasn't okay with it then. So I think that that's a whole other topic. So if that's something you're interested in, shoot me an email, it'snotacrisis@gmail or DM me on Instagram or Facebook and let me know.


Nicole Russo:

All right, well thanks Doryn. It was so much fun.



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